Nexus between Medical Healthcare Professionals and Pharmaceutical Companies : Boon or bane for Patients

  • Balvinder Singh Baba Mastnath University
  • Pawan Jalwal Baba Mastnath University
  • Vikash Kumar Ruhil P.D.M. University
Keywords: Doctors, Medical Healthcare Professionals, Pharmaceutical Companies, Medicine, Patients, Medical Representative, freebies, gifts, Medical Council of India

Abstract

What started as imparting education to medical healthcare professionals, regarding pharmaceutical products by various pharmaceutical companies, has now become a grave, giant problem in the category of bribery and to be more precise, corruption in this 21st century. Now detailing of pharmaceutical company product has included giving free physician’s sample packs, prescription pads, pen and includes an entire range of latest electronic gazettes of mobile phones, laptops, tablets, AC, Refrigerator, LED TV, sponsoring a conference, refreshment to all expenses like return air ticket with free boarding and lodging in national or international tourist spot or hilly area. The real problem is that nothing comes free; all these expenses will add to cost of medicines and medical fraternity will heed least to quality of medicine. Now the market is flooded with abundant, spurious, sub-standard medicines; as pharmaceutical companies have the confidence of selling these products by shelling huge, attractive offers/gifts to some of greedy doctors, who fall prey to their lucrative offers. In this article, the aim is to probe this association or rather; we can call nexus between the medical healthcare professionals and various pharmaceutical companies. Various aspects are covered in this article, like….How this association works? What is the modus operandi and rationale of this association? Various angles of this association; from medical healthcare professionals, medical councils, pharmaceutical companies and society point of views are covered.

Author Biographies

Balvinder Singh, Baba Mastnath University

Shri Baba Mastnath Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Research,
Baba Mastnath University, Rohtak,
Haryana, India

Pawan Jalwal, Baba Mastnath University

Shri Baba Mastnath Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Research,
Baba Mastnath University, Rohtak,
Haryana, India

Vikash Kumar Ruhil, P.D.M. University

P.D.M. College of Pharmacy,
P.D.M. University, Bahadurgarh,
Haryana, India

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Published
2018-03-01
How to Cite
[1]
Singh, B., Jalwal, P. and Ruhil, V.K. 2018. Nexus between Medical Healthcare Professionals and Pharmaceutical Companies : Boon or bane for Patients. PharmaTutor. 6, 3 (Mar. 2018), 17-22. DOI:https://doi.org/10.29161/PT.v6.i3.2018.17.
Section
Articles

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