Human Genome Science: A new face of pharmaceutical science: A Review

  • Tahseen Sameena Azad College of Pharmacy
  • S Sethy Azad College of Pharmacy
  • Prathima Patil
Keywords: Genome, DNA, Plasmid, Sequencing, Forensic, Pharmaceutical

Abstract

The Human Genome Project (HGP) refers to the international 13‐year effort, formally begun in October 1990 and completed in 2003, to discover all the estimated 20,000–25,000 human genes and make them accessible for further biological study. Another goal of this project was to determine the complete sequence of the 3 billion DNA subunits (bases in the human genome). As part of the HGP, parallel studies were carried out on selected model organisms such as the bacterium E.coli and the mouse to help develop the technology and interpret human gene function. The DOE Human Genome Program and the U.S National institute of Health (NIH) National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) together sponsored the U.S.Human Genome Project.”.

Author Biographies

Tahseen Sameena, Azad College of Pharmacy

Department Of Pharmaceutics.
Azad College of Pharmacy
Moinabad-Chilkur Road , Hyderabad, India

S Sethy, Azad College of Pharmacy

Department Of Pharmaceutics.
Azad College of Pharmacy
Moinabad-Chilkur Road , Hyderabad, India

Prathima Patil

Department Of Pharmaceutics.
Azad College of Pharmacy
Moinabad-Chilkur Road , Hyderabad, India

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Published
2017-10-01
How to Cite
[1]
Sameena, T., Sethy, S. and Patil, P. 2017. Human Genome Science: A new face of pharmaceutical science: A Review. PharmaTutor. 5, 10 (Oct. 2017), 30-47.
Section
Articles